The best James Bond books by Anthony Horowitz

Outside of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the James Bond film franchise is arguably the most continuous movie franchise of all time. However, its source, the original books by Ian Fleming, does not have the same reputation as other highly adapted authors such as J.R.R. Tolkien or Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. With British literary exports continuing, Bond is as unique as movie-loving Americans seem indifferent to books. From 1953 to 1966, Ian Fleming wrote twelve James Bond novels and two collections of short stories. But when it comes to thunder or MoonrakerFinding someone to say “the book was better” is almost as improbable as Bond going through all day without a cocktail.

So the question is: If you’ve skipped the Bond books, should you read them? Maybe not! Although Fleming pioneered the espionage literature that revolutionized turning the page, it is very difficult to make a strong argument that a contemporary reader (or the average Bond fan) would love to read Fleming-Bond for one simple reason: Many books are so dated (in sometimes) are offensive. While a case can be made for individual narratives (again, Moonraker And the thunder Fabulous, as is On Her Majesty’s Secret Service), others, such as live and die (1954) and The spy who loved me (1962), it can only be read with a bag over your head. To really enjoy yourself and feel good about the world at the same time, you really have to choose the old Bond books very carefully. But there is a solution to this problem. If you’re looking for official James Bond books that are actually legitimately brilliant and not as problematic as their literary predecessors, three more recent novels – all published between 2015 and 2022 – are close to perfect.

That’s right: for the best book fix available right now, an already curious reader might want to start their 007 print adventure with three great books by Anthony Horowitz. these books mortis trigger (2015), forever and day (2018), the last of the Horowitz trio, With a mind to killwhich was published in May 2022.

mortis trigger

mortis trigger

To be clear, Horowitz is by no means the first author hired by the Fleming family to continue the adventures of James Bond in book form. This tradition began in 1968 when Kingsley Ames wrote the 007 . book Colonel Sun Under the pseudonym “Robert Markham,” just four years after his friend’s death in 1964. But for Bond fans, all of the “sequel” books are interesting, and the full-blown 007 writer will find solid entries like John Gardner The license has been renewed (1981) or William Boyd single (2013).

What makes Horowitz’s books so attractive and unique is that they really are Feel Like modern versions of Fleming’s texts. Horowitz is the only Bond author who has been able to use Ian Fleming’s unpublished material and weave it into completely original adventures. in mortis trigger, this results in some actual Fleming’s prose lifted from a manuscript called “Hell on Wheels,” which gives the chariot sequence a sense of awe. in forever and a daySome Fleming’s Journey prose has been incorporated, as well as some concepts from the unmade James Bond TV series. While these details give the Horowitz Bond novels an extra touch of legitimacy, you’ll hardly notice the aspects that came from Horowitz and which came from Fleming. prose pattern These books are perfect. If Horowitz were James Bond’s tailor, he’d be Eva Green in the 2006 movie version of casino royale, Able to scale Bond’s size and create the perfect suit for him with just one look.

Part of the reason Horowitz’s books serve as an alternative introduction to Fleming Bond is that each of his books falls within the chronology of the original series of novels, which means we’re usually in the late 1950s. his first book, mortis triggeris all about Bond going undercover as a race car driver at the French Grand Prix (really!) and set right after the race is over. gold finger. second book forever and a day, happen before Casino Royale Focuses on Bond’s first introductory film00 Agent mission, in which he investigates the murder of the last agent with the number “007”. Finally, the latest book, With a mind to kill, Picks up the pieces from Fleming’s latest Bond novel: Unequal at Large The man with the golden gun.

forever and a day

forever and a day

forever and a day

Now 44% off

Although Horowitz is a huge fan of Fleming’s original books, his books subvert much of what Bond stood for in the 1950s and 1960s. He may not admit it, but Horowitz’s books are a true reassessment of how James Bond relates to British colonialism, Cold War machismo, and outright sexism. The point of view of these books Feel Like the lens of the twenty-first century, even though you read historical novels. Because the craft of books admits this retrospectively, the inherent criticism of Bond runs through every novel.

Case in point: Latest book, With a mind to kill, has several Easter eggs that reference the books of John le Carré, a spy novelist many believe, correctly, to be the antithesis of Ian Fleming. In Le Carré’s espionage world, a character like James Bond couldn’t exist, since Bond’s ingenuity would be too impractical to do any real espionage. However, in With a mind to killHorowitz takes on the hard reality of Le Carré’s masterpiece, The spy who came from the cold, And imagine what it would be like for Bond. What if Bond she did He should pretend like he’s going to withdraw to the Soviet Union, for example complete book? What would that feel like? Complemented by the close calls at the Berlin Wall checkpoints and the moments when the reader isn’t quite sure what Bond intends to read, it’s impossible for fans of spy novels to read. With a mind to kill And don’t imagine Fleming and Lou Carrey getting drunk and just deciding to do a mashup. But if you haven’t read either From Russian with love (Fleming) or call of the dead (Le Carré), then With a mind to kill It can be a drug portal for you both.

With his sobering orgasms, it’s tempting to say that Horowitz did for the new James Bond books what the Daniel Craig films did in the film franchise. But it’s actually more interesting and subtle than that. By fusing Fleming’s impulse sense of storytelling with Le Carré’s mental puzzles, Horowitz created the James Bond Fleming books. should They wrote. in mortis triggerHorowitz succinctly gives us a moment in which Bond saves the lives of an anonymous henchman, mostly due to Horowitz’s belief – like Fleming claimedBond isn’t really sadistic. “It bothers him to kill people,” Fleming said Tell play boy In 1964, the idea that Horowitz plays forever and a day When we first feel this feeling of apparent Bond numbness. After a particularly brutal murder, Horowitz tells us Bond “feeled nothing,” which is another way of saying, Bond really screwed up.

With a mind to kill

With a mind to kill

With a mind to kill

Now 15% off

In addition to flashes of psychological realism, Horowitz Bond is also more politically advanced by default, mostly because this version of Bond not only faces gay villains, but instead has great gay friends like Agent Charles Henry Duggan, introduced in mortis trigger. As Duggan tells Bond, “The problem with you, James, is that you’re basically being proud.” It’s a clever reflection of our perception of the famous secret agent. It’s not that James Bond is this sex god, who can do whatever he wants. It is actually a type of vanilla. This is the reason for the end of Fleming MoonrakerBond is so sad that Gala Brand doesn’t want to be his girlfriend. In fact, the end Moonraker-“He touched it for the last time and then walked away from each other and set out on their different lives”- actually proves that Fleming contained a sad version of Bond within the most trusted version we know. But Horowitz is always better at making you believe that Bond exists; He removes the Matryoshka doll’s cap often, revealing the younger Bond underneath. But not often to prevent an escape adventure from happening.

Because forever and day He prequel, we get a more subtle James Bond – this time, he’s falling in love with an older woman (by the adorable name of Sixteen) who Known bad for him. It’s Mrs. Robinson’s trick that shouldn’t work, but it does work anyway, in part because Horowitz is as good at describing wine, food, and locations as Fleming was. In fact, the best scene in forever and day It might be when Bond and Sixteen have some salad and wine in their villa. It’s sexy, realistic, sexy, and relatable all at the same time. Although films have a reputation for stylized action scenes, the appeal of the novels can often be found in the accurate descriptions of everyday tasks. Bond controls every movement, from the precise arrangement of his morning eggs to his famous double-baths—hot at first, but swelteringly cold at the last second. In short, what was great about Fleming was not the fantasy of a secret agent who could sleep all the time or visit exotic places, but instead, that person could control their daily routine to the smallest detail. Bond is the ultimate enhancer, something you may have felt in the 1950s, but may be erased as a bit anal and inflexible now. In the 1950s, Bond was popular for his daily obsession with detail. But now, it’s more than just weird, and it’s in this twist that Horowitz finds interesting holes in his armor. While some might read Bond’s novel where things go rather well for 007 for 200 pages, the things that upset Bond’s routine are very compelling—and ironically, comforting.

In the movie 2021 No time to dieJames Bond (Daniel Craig) lost so spectacularly that he actually died while saving the world, but Horowitz didn’t go that far. 007 of these novels still tend to win, but hardly. However, there is a sense of awe that hangs over all of these books’ little Bond victories. It’s as if the clock is ticking until this type of hostile hero can no longer get away with getting killed, which is exactly how a really cool spy novel trick works. The reader thinks that all things will be one way, even, of course, not at all. Many of Ian Fleming’s old paperback books had the phrase “James Bond thriller” running vertically down the front cover. We call them thrillers because we expect thrills, but we’re not sure what suspense is. In that moment of anticipation and surprise, the Horowitz Bond novels achieved the goal every time.

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