Do you want to eat nutritious food at a lower cost? Save the skins and replace them with fresh by freezing

Convenience eating is the death knell for people who have to reach deep into their pockets to afford soaring food and grocery bills in a cost-of-living crisis, believes wellbeing advisor and consultant Frances Young.

Young has been promoting and supporting people to eat healthy for 30 years, and she says it’s her biggest piece of advice Anyone who wants to eat nutritiously without breaking the bank It is an investment of time in planning and cooking meals.

“People often talk about lack of time, but your health, well-being, and living within your means and budget are worth having the time to make those decisions.”

She recommends sitting down once or twice a week to plan meals full of vegetables, high in fiber and It keeps you full for longerand provided three easy ways to help do this.

Read more:
* Seven healthy eating hacks for busy people
* How can you eat more sustainably
* Kai with Soul: Think Wise, Shop Smart

Get rid of the scale

Keeping potato skins, kamara, and all the starchy vegetables on hand when preparing meals is a hassle-free way to get more nutrients into your meal, and it saves you prep and cleanup time.

Invest time in planning and cooking meals to help ensure that your food budget goes a long way.

123RF

Invest time in planning and cooking meals to help ensure that your food budget goes a long way.

“You get more fiber in your diet by keeping the crust on, you’re full longer, satiated for longer, and then you don’t have hunger pangs,” Young said.

Keeping vegetables peeled means they take longer to digest, unlike eating heavily processed “ready-to-eat” foods, which often leave you feeling hungry again after a short period of time.

Replace fresh with frozen

Young’s easiest tip for cutting dinner costs is to use frozen veggies, which are often a lot cheaper than buying fresh and are still packed with all the goodness.

“Frozen is just as good and there is less waste,” she said. “They have already been prepared, and they often have better nutritional value than fresh as they were picked and frozen within an hour of being in the field.”

Frances Young is a consultant and wellness consultant and is holding a cooking show at Vegan Expo on November 20 specifically about cheap and nutritious meals.

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Frances Young is a consultant and wellness consultant and is holding a cooking show at Vegan Expo on November 20 specifically about cheap and nutritious meals.

Green beans, for example, are significantly cheaper frozen than fresh. The frozen batch of Pams costs $0.39 per 100g, which is more than 75% savings over the fresh green bean Pams which cost $1.80 per 100g.

These changes add up, and can equal savings [car] Young said.

Make breakfast the biggest meal of the day

According to an old wives’ tale, breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and often the cheapest.

The principle of healthy eating habits for a healthy body and a healthy bank balance [is] Make your breakfast the biggest meal of the day.

A glass of orange juice is a great way to start the day, but wellness consultant Frances Young suggests making breakfast the biggest meal of the day to help you save money.

Pxfuel/ Supplied

A glass of orange juice is a great way to start the day, but wellness consultant Frances Young suggests making breakfast the biggest meal of the day to help you save money.

With options like whole-grain porridge, fruit and yogurt, or baked beans on wholemeal toast, breakfast is “easily the cheapest meal of the day,” she said, and eating it will cut down on snacking later.

Recipe to try: Carrot and stray red lentils

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon of oil

1 tablespoon of whole grain mustard

Half a teaspoon of ground cumin

2 large grated carrots

500 ml of vegetable broth

Half a cup of washed red lentils

1 tablespoon of peanut butter

1 teaspoon curry powder

Pepper to taste

method:

  1. Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat

  2. Add mustard, whole grains, and cumin, and stir

  3. Add the carrots and cook for 10 minutes to allow the carrots to soften, tossing regularly

  4. Add stock and lentils. Simmer for 30 minutes

  5. Add peanut butter, curry powder, and pepper

  6. Simmer for 5 minutes, then serve

  7. Garnish with yogurt and coriander or mint

* Young will be presenting a cooking demonstration focusing on cheap meals at the Vegetarian Show at Hari Rua (University of Canterbury) on Sunday. $5 adult tickets from veganexpo.co.nzAges 16 and under are free.

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