Chromebooks, tablets, and free Wi-Fi are available to some eligible Stockton residents

Hundreds of Stockton residents received their laptops, tablets and even free internet as part of the Digital Equality Project, which was set up during the pandemic and funded through federal aid such as the US Bailout Act. The city purchased more than 1,500 Chromebooks and hotspots, and 500 data-enabled tablets. The devices come with prepaid internet access for three years, and through census data, city officials have found “digital deserts” and worked to prioritize some underserved communities. It has gone from being a luxury to a necessity in the last couple of years. “What we have learned through COVID is that many things are now online. There is a lot of telehealth that has happened, so we want our core audience to have the resources to have better health outcomes and better job opportunities.” The early stages of the program require income and eligibility processing. Jenny Fontanella, deputy director of the Stockton-San Joaquin County Library, adds that 20-25% of Stockton households do not have home internet, “so they rely on cell phones or public places to access wifi.” The American Community Survey found that households who depended on smartphones to access Internet services were more likely to make $25,000 or less, be headed by someone under 35, or have a black or Hispanic family member. It showed that smartphone ownership exceeded ownership of all other computing devices and was present in 84% of households, while 78% of households own a desktop or laptop computer. Tablet ownership was 63%, and the report also found that online subscription rates were higher in higher-income households, and lower subscription rates included renting families, families who spoke limited English, and families with at least one person with a disability. On Tuesday morning, dozens of families stood outside the Fair Oaks library to take advantage of the city’s support, and many of these people told KCRA 3 that they pay too much for their internet services. The start of this school year has been tough, she herself said, because they all share one computer at home. She was 106th just before noon. Jones is convinced that such resources have the potential to change Stockton’s future. “I think if they get together and do more things like that – especially for young people – maybe it can transform all this violence that’s going on.” The last distribution takes place on Friday. Here’s how to check if you qualify for income. You can also email StocktonDigitalEquity@stocktonca.gov or call 209-937-8545. The city did not say how many devices will be available.

Hundreds of Stockton residents received their laptops, tablets, and even free internet as part of digital stock projectwhich were created during the pandemic and funded through federal aid such as the US Rescue Plan Act.

Using ARPA money, the city purchased more than 1,500 Chromebooks, hotspots, and 500 data-enabled tablets. The devices come with prepaid internet access for three years.

Through census data, city officials have found “digital deserts” and worked to prioritize some disadvantaged communities.

The mayor of Stockton, Kevin J. Lincoln II, said access to computers and the Internet has gone from being a luxury to a necessity in the past two years.

“What we have learned through COVID is that many things are now online. There is a lot of telehealth that has happened, so we want our constituent audience to have the resources to achieve better health outcomes and better job opportunities as well.”

The early stages of the program require income and eligibility processing.

Jenny Fontanella, deputy director of the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library, adds that 20-25% of Stockton households do not have home internet, “so they rely on cell phones or public places to access their wifi.”

The American Society Survey It found that households that depended on smartphones to access internet services were more likely to make $25,000 or less, be headed by someone under 35, or have a black or Latino family member.

A report from the US Census Bureau in 2021 showed that smartphone ownership exceeded that of all other computing devices and was present in 84% of households, while 78% of households own a desktop or laptop computer. Tablet ownership is 63%.

The report also found that higher rates of Internet subscription were found in higher-income families.

Low participation rates included renting families, families who spoke limited English, and families with at least one person with a disability.

On Tuesday morning, dozens of families stood outside the Fair Oaks library to take advantage of the city’s support.

Many of these people told KCRA 3 that they pay too much for internet services.

Savannah Jones, a mother of five who will go to school by herself, said the start of this school year has been tough because they all share one computer at home.

She was ranked 106 just before noon.

Jones is convinced that such resources have the potential to change Stockton’s future.

“I think if they get together and do more things like this – especially for young people – maybe they can change all this violence that’s going on.”

The last distribution takes place on Friday. Here’s how to check if you qualify for income. You can also send an email StocktonDigitalEquity@stocktonca.gov Or call 209-937-8545.

The city did not say how many devices will be available.

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